All Power to the General Assemblies? Or, the Strange Case of Take Artists Space

All Power to the General Assemblies? Or, the Strange Case of Take Artists Space

After the raid on Zuc­cot­ti Park ear­ly this morn­ing, what remains of Occu­py Wall Street? The library was destroyed and thrown in the garbage; the kitchen and com­mune that fed and housed hun­dreds now gone. But what about the gen­er­al assem­bly? The police vio­lence demon­strates that the rel­e­vance of Occu­py Wall Street as a polit­i­cal sit­u­a­tion is by no means in its attempts, fail­ures and very real suc­cess­es at direct democ­ra­cy. It is instead a ques­tion: what is beyond democ­ra­cy in the spir­it of Occu­py Wall Street?

Is the Party Over?

Is the Party Over?

The occu­pa­tions move­ment is high­ly struc­tured, and this struc­ture is a focal point for polit­i­cal debates. Deci­sions are made by the gen­er­al assem­bly (GA) through a process of demo­c­ra­t­ic delib­er­a­tion; it also serves as the basis for the del­e­ga­tion respon­si­bil­i­ties and tasks, which are required both to keep peo­ple par­tic­i­pat­ing and to orga­nize polit­i­cal activ­i­ty.

Two, Three, Many Oaklands?

Two, Three, Many Oaklands?

All eyes are on Oak­land. And right­ful­ly so. Oak­land has shown the oth­er occu­pa­tions how the move­ment can be suc­cess­ful­ly esca­lat­ed. By trans­form­ing the occu­pa­tion of a park into a gen­er­al strike, Oak­land has indis­putably emerged as the most mil­i­tant sec­tion of the nation­al occu­pa­tion move­ment. All the oth­er occu­pa­tions across the coun­ty are ask­ing them­selves how they can fol­low in its foot­steps. But, as strange as it may sound, the best way to repro­duce the lev­el of mil­i­tan­cy that has erupt­ed in Oak­land may actu­al­ly be to not fol­low in that city’s foot­steps.

Notes on Oakland 2011

Notes on Oakland 2011

We expect his­to­ry to pro­vide us with expla­na­tions – to place the imme­di­a­cy of expe­ri­ence with­in a wider sto­ry whose terms will be pro­gres­sive­ly elab­o­rat­ed and illu­mi­nat­ed. Polit­i­cal action, which aims at inter­ven­ing into his­to­ry and alter­ing its move­ment, has an entire­ly dif­fer­ent kind of truth – a sub­jec­tive truth pro­duced in the act of par­tic­i­pat­ing.

The General Strike: An Incomplete Bibliography for Ambivalent Occupiers

The General Strike: An Incomplete Bibliography for Ambivalent Occupiers

Occu­py Oakland’s call for a day-long gen­er­al strike on Novem­ber 2 has revived inter­est in the tac­tic, calls for which were also heard over the win­ter in Madi­son, Wis­con­sin. Yet the gen­er­al strike is prac­ti­cal­ly unknown today in the Unit­ed States, func­tion­ing more as a rhetor­i­cal index of mil­i­tan­cy than a seri­ous pro­pos­al for uni­fied action. In sol­i­dar­i­ty with this movement’s pro­found rup­ture in polit­i­cal lan­guage, we’ve select­ed a few impor­tant moments in the his­to­ry of the con­cept to illus­trate its poten­tial direc­tions.

Critical Refusals: Angela Davis at Occupy Philadelphia

Critical Refusals: Angela Davis at Occupy Philadelphia

The Inter­na­tion­al Her­bert Mar­cuse Soci­ety held its fourth bien­ni­al con­fer­ence at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Penn­syl­va­nia. A mix of aca­d­e­mics and activists, the con­fer­ence rep­re­sent­ed yet anoth­er attempt to con­nect the two worlds. What bet­ter way than to have Angela Davis her­self – renowned intel­lec­tu­al, renowned com­mu­nist – share her thoughts with us on a chilly Fri­day night.

Oakland

Oakland

A gen­er­al strike has been declared by the Oak­land Gen­er­al Assem­bly. The orig­i­nal ver­sion of this song was the num­ber one hit dur­ing the 1946 Oak­land Gen­er­al Strike.

Issue 1: Occupy Everything

Issue 1: Occupy Everything

Class com­po­si­tion of Occu­py • The first two weeks of Occu­py Philly • The Arab Spring and glob­al finance • Oak­land and its insur­rec­tionary his­to­ry • Pur­to Rican high­er edu­ca­tion and the stu­dent strike • Hip-hop and rev­o­lu­tion­ary prac­tice • The labor move­ment and the future of Occu­py • Trans­la­tions of Cor­nelius Cas­to­ri­adis and Anton Pan­nekoek

The Prince and the Pauper

Every­one on the left has point­ed out that the riots in Lon­don are root­ed in capital’s assault on the work­ing class, couched in the ide­o­log­i­cal lan­guage of aus­ter­i­ty – and that this was the kin­dling sparked by the racist police bru­tal­i­ty that cul­mi­nat­ed in the mur­der of Mark Dug­gan. But our task – like Marx’s task, when he defend­ed the vio­lent upheaval of the Sile­sian weavers – isn’t to give a moral eval­u­a­tion of the riots, like school­mas­ters dili­gent­ly stack­ing the pros against the cons, but, rather, to grasp their spe­cif­ic char­ac­ter.