Immigrant Struggles, Anti-Racism, and May 1968: An Interview with Daniel A. Gordon

Immigrant Struggles, Anti-Racism, and May 1968: An Interview with Daniel A. Gordon

Ques­tions about migra­tion have been a fun­da­men­tal aspect of social­ist think­ing, and orga­niz­ing, for well over a cen­tu­ry. Post­war France, in par­tic­u­lar, offers impor­tant exam­ples of cre­ative ways of deal­ing with the chal­lenges of anti-racist orga­niz­ing, and allows us to redis­cov­er orga­ni­za­tions that were very open to work­ing with a plu­ral­i­ty of immi­grant com­mu­ni­ties, Euro­pean and non-Euro­pean alike, as well as with native-born French peo­ple.

Reading Social Reproduction into Reading Capital

Reading Social Reproduction into Reading Capital

This essay, while sid­ing with the posi­tion that empha­sizes the impor­tance of Althusser’s the­o­ry of read­ing, seeks to exam­ine both the pos­si­bil­i­ties the text opens up for a fem­i­nist read­ing of Marx via the use it has been made by fem­i­nist the­o­rists since its pub­li­ca­tion, but also to point to over­sights of the text itself, par­tic­u­lar­ly con­cern­ing the con­cept of social repro­duc­tion.

Somethin’ Slick Goin’ On: The Proletarian Funk of Johnny “Guitar” Watson

Somethin’ Slick Goin’ On: The Proletarian Funk of Johnny “Guitar” Watson

John­ny “Gui­tar” Wat­son was a fas­ci­nat­ing con­tra­dic­tion: a man dressed like an icon of fame and wealth whose lyrics depict the strug­gle of work­ing peo­ple try­ing to make ends meet in an era of loom­ing eco­nom­ic des­ti­tu­tion. Though he dons a funky get­up, Watson’s bleak expres­sion of work­ing life under eco­nom­ic and social oppres­sion derives from the long blues tra­di­tion dat­ing back to slav­ery and the Recon­struc­tion era.