Stereolab's Revolutionary Horizon

Stereolab’s Revolutionary Horizon

Stere­o­lab is an intellectual’s dream, equal parts vin­tage syn­th man­u­al, obscure bossa nova record, and com­mu­nist tract. Their fetish for odd key­board and odd jazz is well dis­cussed, but their lyrics, often deeply Marx­ist, far less so. 

The Re-encounter of Indianismo and Marxism in the Work of Álvaro García Linera

The Re-encounter of Indianismo and Marxism in the Work of Álvaro García Linera

By Iri­na Alexan­dra Feld­man. In his impor­tant arti­cle about the his­tory of Marx­ism and Indi­an­ismo in Bolivia, Álvaro Gar­cía Lin­era tells the sto­ry of the “missed encoun­ter of the two rev­o­lu­tion­ary rea­sons.” He presents the post-colo­nial Boli­vian con­text as a space of com­plex engage­ments for the Marx­ist tra­di­tion.

Introduction: A Bolivian Marxist Seduced

Introduction: A Bolivian Marxist Seduced

By Robert Cavooris. Álvaro Gar­cía Lin­era, vice-pres­i­dent to Bolivia’s Evo Morales, was per­haps the first Marx­ist intel­lec­tu­al to sit in state pow­er in the 21st cen­tu­ry. His work reflects a con­tin­ued engage­ment with a unique polit­i­cal exper­i­ment in Bolivia, and can be read, there­fore, as a guide to a ter­rain on which some are try­ing to plow an even­tu­al road to social­ism. It is the wager of this dossier, there­fore, that much can be learned by more close­ly exam­in­ing both Linera’s the­o­ry and his polit­i­cal prac­tice – not only to under­stand the man him­self, but also, to under­stand the inno­v­a­tive polit­i­cal process from which he can­not be sep­a­rat­ed, and which may por­tend some­thing of the future for the elec­toral Left in oth­er parts of the world.

Burdens of a State Manager

Burdens of a State Manager

By Jef­fery R. Web­ber. The pro­lific writ­ings of Vice-Pres­i­dent Álvaro Gar­cía Lin­era offer one win­dow into the com­plex­i­ties of the polit­i­cal, ide­o­log­i­cal, and eco­nom­ic devel­op­ments that have tran­spired since Morales first assumed office. With that in mind, the fol­low­ing detailed expo­si­tion and crit­i­cal inter­ro­ga­tion of the core argu­ments advanced in his 2011 book, Ten­siones cre­ati­vas de la rev­olu­ción , is meant to shed some light on what is at stake in the com­pet­ing char­ac­ter­i­za­tions of the “process of change” unfold­ing in Bolivia since 2006.