Verónica Gago

is part of Colectivo Situaciones, teaches in the School of Social Sciences at Buenos Aires University, and is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET). She is currently working on a project exploring popular economies in post-neoliberal contexts.

The Feminist International: Appropriating and Overflowing the Strike

The Feminist International: Appropriating and Overflowing the Strike

The strike appro­pri­at­ed by the women’s move­ment is lit­er­al­ly over­flowed: it must account for mul­ti­ple labor real­i­ties that escape the bor­ders of waged and union­ized work, that ques­tion the lim­its between pro­duc­tive and repro­duc­tive labor, for­mal and infor­mal labor, remu­ner­at­ed and free tasks, between migrant and nation­al labor, between the employed and the unem­ployed. The strike tak­en up by the women’s move­ment direct­ly tar­gets a cen­tral ele­ment of the cap­i­tal­ist sys­tem: the sex­u­al and colo­nial divi­sion of labor.

Is there a war “on” the body of women?:  Finance, territory, and violence

Is there a war “on” the body of women?: Finance, territory, and violence

There was thus a trans­ver­sal­i­ty to the polit­i­cal com­po­si­tion of the strike (unions, grass­roots ter­ri­to­r­i­al orga­ni­za­tions, queer col­lec­tives, stu­dent groups, health cen­ters, migrant col­lec­tives, self-orga­nized indi­vid­u­als, etc.). There was also an inter­sec­tion­al­i­ty of prob­lem­at­ics that were able to make a con­crete cri­tique of renewed forms of cap­i­tal­ist exploita­tion, through their focus on labor.

The Strike of Those Who Can't Stop: An Interview with Verónica Gago and Natalia Fontana

The Strike of Those Who Can’t Stop: An Interview with Verónica Gago and Natalia Fontana

To strike is to chal­lenge and block the forms of pro­duc­ing and repro­duc­ing life in homes, in neigh­bor­hoods, in work­places. It is to con­nect vio­lence against women with the spe­cif­ic polit­i­cal nature of the cur­rent forms of exploita­tion of the pro­duc­tion and repro­duc­tion of life. The strike was the key that enabled us to unite those two things.

Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui: Against Internal Colonialism

Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui: Against Internal Colonialism

Sil­via Rivera Cusi­can­qui is an Aymara activist, soci­ol­o­gist, and oral his­to­ri­an who has worked with indige­nous move­ments in Bolivia over the last four decades. Her work pro­vides a valu­able cri­tique of cer­tain forms of indige­nous iden­ti­ty pol­i­tics, and a bal­ance sheet of anti­colo­nial strug­gles in the coun­try more broad­ly.

Clandestine Progress

Clandestine Progress

In the dis­course of “slav­ery,” the tex­tile work­shops and their thou­sands of migrant work­ers are a sort of black hole where anoth­er type of human­i­ty is con­cen­trat­ed, one that is nev­er ful­ly rec­og­nized as such, oth­er than under the idea of com­plete for­eign­ness.