Salar Mohandesi

is a founding editor of Viewpoint and a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Pennsylvania.

Critical Refusals: Angela Davis at Occupy Philadelphia

Critical Refusals: Angela Davis at Occupy Philadelphia

The Inter­na­tion­al Her­bert Mar­cuse Soci­ety held its fourth bien­ni­al con­fer­ence at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Penn­syl­va­nia. A mix of aca­d­e­mics and activists, the con­fer­ence rep­re­sent­ed yet anoth­er attempt to con­nect the two worlds. What bet­ter way than to have Angela Davis her­self – renowned intel­lec­tu­al, renowned com­mu­nist – share her thoughts with us on a chilly Fri­day night.

Everybody Talks About the Weather

Everybody Talks About the Weather

It could very well be that the dura­bil­i­ty and rad­i­cal­iza­tion of this move­ment will rely on its poten­tial as a medi­at­ing ele­ment between the the var­i­ous seg­ments of the class, their par­tic­u­lar inter­ests, and their tra­di­tion­al forms of strug­gle. Achiev­ing this means going beyond a spon­ta­neous reflec­tion of changes in our work­ing lives. It has to start by under­stand­ing the sys­tem under­ly­ing them.

The Prince and the Pauper

Every­one on the left has point­ed out that the riots in Lon­don are root­ed in capital’s assault on the work­ing class, couched in the ide­o­log­i­cal lan­guage of aus­ter­i­ty – and that this was the kin­dling sparked by the racist police bru­tal­i­ty that cul­mi­nat­ed in the mur­der of Mark Dug­gan. But our task – like Marx’s task, when he defend­ed the vio­lent upheaval of the Sile­sian weavers – isn’t to give a moral eval­u­a­tion of the riots, like school­mas­ters dili­gent­ly stack­ing the pros against the cons, but, rather, to grasp their spe­cif­ic char­ac­ter.