Sandro Mezzadra

teaches Political Theory at the University of Bologna, has long been engaged in activist projects, and is an active participant in the "post-workerist" debate (see particularly Euronomade). Among other books, he is, with Brett Neilson, author of Border as Method.

Reinventing Communist Politics

Reinventing Communist Politics

Francesco Raparelli: An original “constellation” of capital is presented in Border as Method. The notion of the “multiplication of labor,” in particular, clearly grasps the “great transformation” in which we are immersed. Is a communist politics that takes seriously the irreducible multiplicity of exploitation that you describe so well still possible? Sandro Mezzadra: My work with Brett, Border as Method,… Read more →

Political Anatomy of the South American Conjuncture: Images of Development and New Social Conflict in the Present Period

Political Anatomy of the South American Conjuncture: Images of Development and New Social Conflict in the Present Period

Despite these ostensibly “progressive” victories, the region’s period of left-wing state dominance may have reached its limits, and in some cases, fallen into outright conservatism. Consequently, there’s a need for a re-activiation of political struggle at the grassroots level to overcome the inertia of the political cycle.

The State of Capitalist Globalization

The State of Capitalist Globalization

The State Stripped Bare It seems almost a paradox, or perhaps just an anachronism, to suggest that it is possible to describe the global situation from the vantage point of the state. Flows and scapes, transnational corporations, migratory movements, financialization, supply chains, the “unholy trinity” of the World Bank, IMF, and WTO – these are the actors, processes, and entities… Read more →

The Multiplication of Labor: An Interview

The Multiplication of Labor: An Interview

The mobility of labor was indeed part and parcel of the very “environment” within which workerism took shape in the early 1960s in Italy. Internal migration from the South of the country was challenging the political culture of the labor movement in the North, profoundly transforming the composition of the working class and at the same time reshaping the terms of the “Southern question.”