Sandro Mezzadra

teaches Political Theory at the University of Bologna, has long been engaged in activist projects, and is an active participant in the "post-workerist" debate (see particularly Euronomade). Among other books, he is, with Brett Neilson, author of Border as Method.

Reinventing Communist Politics

Reinventing Communist Politics

Francesco Rapar­el­li: An orig­i­nal “con­stel­la­tion” of cap­i­tal is pre­sent­ed in Bor­der as Method. The notion of the “mul­ti­pli­ca­tion of labor,” in par­tic­u­lar, clear­ly grasps the “great trans­for­ma­tion” in which we are immersed. Is a com­mu­nist pol­i­tics that takes seri­ous­ly the irre­ducible mul­ti­plic­i­ty of exploita­tion that you describe so well still pos­si­ble? San­dro Mez­zadra: My work with Brett, Bor­der as Method,… Read more →

Political Anatomy of the South American Conjuncture: Images of Development and New Social Conflict in the Present Period

Political Anatomy of the South American Conjuncture: Images of Development and New Social Conflict in the Present Period

Despite these osten­si­bly “pro­gres­sive” vic­to­ries, the region’s peri­od of left-wing state dom­i­nance may have reached its lim­its, and in some cas­es, fall­en into out­right con­ser­vatism. Con­se­quent­ly, there’s a need for a re-activi­a­tion of polit­i­cal strug­gle at the grass­roots lev­el to over­come the iner­tia of the polit­i­cal cycle.

The State of Capitalist Globalization

The State of Capitalist Globalization

The State Stripped Bare It seems almost a para­dox, or per­haps just an anachro­nism, to sug­gest that it is pos­si­ble to describe the glob­al sit­u­a­tion from the van­tage point of the state. Flows and scapes, transna­tion­al cor­po­ra­tions, migra­to­ry move­ments, finan­cial­iza­tion, sup­ply chains, the “unholy trin­i­ty” of the World Bank, IMF, and WTO – these are the actors, process­es, and enti­ties… Read more →

The Multiplication of Labor: An Interview

The Multiplication of Labor: An Interview

The mobil­i­ty of labor was indeed part and par­cel of the very “envi­ron­ment” with­in which work­erism took shape in the ear­ly 1960s in Italy. Inter­nal migra­tion from the South of the coun­try was chal­leng­ing the polit­i­cal cul­ture of the labor move­ment in the North, pro­found­ly trans­form­ing the com­po­si­tion of the work­ing class and at the same time reshap­ing the terms of the “South­ern ques­tion.”