Liz Mason-Deese

Liz Mason-Deese is a member of the Viewpoint Magazine Editorial Collective and currently teaches Geography at George Mason University. Her research explores the territorial and neighborhood organizing of unemployed workers’ movements and other popular movements in Argentina. Her translation of Verónica Gago’s Neoliberalism from Below was recently published by Duke University Press. She will soon be unemployed and encourages the reader to find her a job.

From #MeToo to #WeStrike: A Politics in Feminine

From #MeToo to #WeStrike: A Politics in Feminine

What will it take to move from #MeToo to #WeStrike? As the Latin Amer­i­can move­ments have shown, it is in the prac­tice of this pol­i­tics in fem­i­nine that a new col­lec­tive sub­jec­tiv­i­ty is born. It is not our expe­ri­ences of vio­lence that define who we are, but our strug­gle against vio­lence that defines a col­lec­tive we.

Striking for Ourselves

Striking for Ourselves

The strike allows us to find each oth­er, and to togeth­er con­sti­tute a new col­lec­tive sub­ject, bring­ing our bod­ies togeth­er in a com­mon action and shared ter­ri­to­ry. Just as women’s labor takes many forms, so does the women’s strike: a work stop­page, a walk­out, a march, a pick­et, a block­ade, a shop­ping boy­cott, col­lec­tive­ly refus­ing gen­der roles.

The Neighborhood is the New Factory

The Neighborhood is the New Factory

The move­ments of the unem­ployed, which first emerged in Argenti­na in the mid-1990s, chal­lenge tra­di­tion­al rep­re­sen­ta­tions of the unem­ployed as lack­ing polit­i­cal agency and rev­o­lu­tion­ary poten­tial. While many Marx­ists and labor orga­niz­ers have main­tained the lat­ter posi­tion, Argentina’s recent his­to­ry paints a dif­fer­ent pic­ture: the mil­i­tant orga­ni­za­tion of the unem­ployed across the coun­try was instru­men­tal in over­throw­ing the neolib­er­al gov­ern­ment in 2001 and steer­ing the course the coun­try would take fol­low­ing the eco­nom­ic cri­sis. Move­ments of the unem­ployed in Argenti­na are redefin­ing work through their orga­ni­za­tion­al prac­tice, dis­cours­es around labor, and active cre­ation of dif­fer­ent forms of pro­duc­tion and repro­duc­tion.