Liz Mason-Deese

is a member of the Viewpoint editorial collective and currently teaches geography at the University of Mary Washington. She is also on the National Organizing Committee for the March 8 Women's Strike in the United States.

Striking for Ourselves

Striking for Ourselves

The strike allows us to find each oth­er, and to togeth­er con­sti­tute a new col­lec­tive sub­ject, bring­ing our bod­ies togeth­er in a com­mon action and shared ter­ri­to­ry. Just as women’s labor takes many forms, so does the women’s strike: a work stop­page, a walk­out, a march, a pick­et, a block­ade, a shop­ping boy­cott, col­lec­tive­ly refus­ing gen­der roles.

The Neighborhood is the New Factory

The Neighborhood is the New Factory

The move­ments of the unem­ployed, which first emerged in Argenti­na in the mid-1990s, chal­lenge tra­di­tion­al rep­re­sen­ta­tions of the unem­ployed as lack­ing polit­i­cal agen­cy and rev­o­lu­tion­ary poten­tial. While many Marx­ists and labor orga­niz­ers have main­tained the lat­ter posi­tion, Argentina’s recent his­to­ry paints a dif­fer­ent pic­ture: the mil­i­tant orga­ni­za­tion of the unem­ployed across the coun­try was instru­men­tal in over­throw­ing the neolib­er­al gov­ern­ment in 2001 and steer­ing the course the coun­try would take fol­low­ing the eco­nom­ic cri­sis. Move­ments of the unem­ployed in Argenti­na are redefin­ing work through their orga­ni­za­tion­al prac­tice, dis­cours­es around labor, and active cre­ation of dif­fer­ent forms of pro­duc­tion and repro­duc­tion.