Joshua Bloom

teaches Sociology at UCLA. He is the author, with Waldo E. Martin, of Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party, and co-editor of Working for Justice: The L.A. Model of Organizing and Advocacy.

Insurgent Practice and the Black Panther Party: an Interview with Joshua Bloom

Insurgent Practice and the Black Panther Party: an Interview with Joshua Bloom

The Black Pan­ther Par­ty was able to sus­tain dis­rup­tion because the char­ac­ter of the prac­tices that they had devel­oped, that cul­tur­al tech­nol­o­gy of armed self-defense cou­pled with this anti-impe­ri­al­ism. It meant that the more author­i­ties repressed them, the more they were able to gath­er broad allies, who oth­er­wise wouldn’t have sup­port­ed the par­ty in the first place, but also had their own rea­sons to real­ly feel threat­ened by the sta­tus quo.