Jeffery R. Webber

Jeffery R. Webber is a Senior Lecturer of International Political Economy at Goldsmiths, University of London and a member of the editorial board of Historical Materialism. His latest book is The Last Day of Oppression, and the First Day of the Same: The Politics and Economics of the New Latin American Left (Haymarket, 2017). He is presently working on a new book for Verso, The Latin American Crucible: Politics and Power in the New Era.

The Left and Right in Latin America Today: An Interview with Claudio Katz

The Left and Right in Latin America Today: An Interview with Claudio Katz

There has not been a counter-revolution, there has been a process of advance for the Right, but with popular resistance. And it’s interesting that there is a new generation. Those who struggle now have processed the experience of the progressive cycle. We will see how they translate this politically, we don’t know. But the generation that produced the earlier cycle did it without experience, arising out of pure neoliberalism. Now, the new generation is leading this process.

A Colonial Encounter

From Nuestra América to Abya Yala: Notes on Imperialism and Anti-imperialism in Latin America across Centuries

For the indigenous population of the Americas, 1492 signifies the closure of self-determined history and the beginning of near demographic annihilation. From the vantage point of Spanish and Portuguese rulers, the same moment signals the ascent of far-reaching feudal empires and the concomitant rewards of extraordinary geographic preponderance.

Burdens of a State Manager

Burdens of a State Manager

By Jeffery R. Webber. The prolific writings of Vice-President Álvaro García Linera offer one window into the complexities of the political, ideological, and economic developments that have transpired since Morales first assumed office. With that in mind, the following detailed exposition and critical interrogation of the core arguments advanced in his 2011 book, Tensiones creativas de la revolución , is meant to shed some light on what is at stake in the competing characterizations of the “process of change” unfolding in Bolivia since 2006.