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Issue 6: Imperialism

Issue 6: Imperialism

Strate­gies and Sol­i­dar­i­ties • The­o­ret­i­cal Encoun­ters • Con­cep­tu­al­iz­ing Impe­ri­al­ism Today • Artic­u­la­tion and Modes of Pro­duc­tion • Impe­ri­al­ism and the Com­intern • Black Inter­na­tion­al­ism

Internationalism against Imperialism

Internationalism against Imperialism

If impe­ri­al­ism today is irre­ducible to any sin­gle phe­nom­e­non, then this is because it appears at once both ubiq­ui­tous and dis­persed. How then to account today for the his­to­ry that has ampli­fied impe­ri­al­ism while mak­ing it all the more dif­fi­cult to define?

Transnational Solidarity on the Gay and Lesbian Left: An Interview With Emily Hobson

Transnational Solidarity on the Gay and Lesbian Left: An Interview With Emily Hobson

What I focus on is how queer rad­i­cals didn’t just work to win accep­tance, but actu­al­ly changed the mean­ings of anti-cap­i­tal­ist and anti-impe­ri­al­ist strug­gle to incor­po­rate sex­u­al lib­er­a­tion – pre­cise­ly because cap­i­tal­ism and colo­nial­ism depend on rigid sex­u­al reg­u­la­tion.

Notes on Libya

The point is not to debate whether or not Libya was a social­ist state. Much more inter­est­ing is under­stand­ing what were its strengths and what were its weak­ness­es.

Rules for Destroying Countries: China and the Colonial World in the Early 20th Century

Rules for Destroying Countries: China and the Colonial World in the Early 20th Century

At the same time that J. A. Hob­son was writ­ing Impe­ri­al­ism: A Study (1902), Liang Qichao, a major turn-of-the-cen­tu­ry Chi­nese intel­lec­tu­al and jour­nal­ist, wrote a mag­is­te­r­i­al essay on what he called “the new rules for destroy­ing coun­tries” [mieguo xin­fa]. As Liang makes clear, con­cep­tu­al­iz­ing mod­ern Chi­nese his­to­ry as dialec­ti­cal­ly part of mod­ern glob­al his­to­ry not only helps gen­er­ate new ques­tions of and in the­o­ries of impe­ri­al­ism and moder­ni­ty, it also helps gen­er­ate new ques­tions about Chi­nese his­to­ry and the his­to­ry of glob­al rev­o­lu­tions.

The Normal and Exceptional Forms of Enclosure in Okinawa: Going Beyond the So-Called Base Problem

The Normal and Exceptional Forms of Enclosure in Okinawa: Going Beyond the So-Called Base Problem

The U.S. mil­i­tary in post-WWII Oki­nawa was not only inter­est­ed in expro­pri­at­ing pub­lic and pri­vate lands in order to trans­form Oki­nawa into its key­stone of the Pacif­ic. It was also inter­est­ed in allow­ing base enclo­sures to per­form the con­stant ide­o­log­i­cal work of nor­mal­iz­ing cap­i­tal­ist social rela­tions in the islands. In oth­er words, there was an artic­u­la­tion that com­pli­cates our under­stand­ing of how impe­ri­al­ist pow­er oper­ates; an artic­u­la­tion between mil­i­tary force and the restruc­tur­ing of social life on a broad scale, name­ly through the redraw­ing of prop­er­ty rela­tions.

The Name of Algeria: French Philosophy and the Subject of Decolonization

The Name of Algeria: French Philosophy and the Subject of Decolonization

A hypo­thet­i­cal “Alger­ian his­to­ry of French phi­los­o­phy” elic­its a var­ie­gat­ed but in many ways opaque pic­ture. Arguably, it is only the gen­er­a­tion that came of polit­i­cal age in the late 1950s and ear­ly 1960s – the gen­er­a­tion of Bal­ibar and Ran­cière – that, with con­sid­er­able delay, incor­po­rat­ed the ques­tions raised by the decol­o­niza­tion of France and Alge­ria into their think­ing, but when they did so it was not in terms of the prob­lem­at­ic of rev­o­lu­tion­ary anti-colo­nial vio­lence, but in terms of the antin­o­mies of cit­i­zen­ship.

“Why We Appear”: The Brief Revival of The Anti-Imperialist Review

“Why We Appear”: The Brief Revival of The Anti-Imperialist Review

The LAI’s the­o­ret­i­cal organ The Anti-Impe­ri­al­ist Review and its edi­to­r­i­al his­to­ry rep­re­sent a con­stituent source of mil­i­tant reportage on glob­al anti-impe­ri­al­ism between the two World Wars, as well as a rig­or­ous effort to con­struct a con­cep­tu­al frame­work with­in which the inter­na­tion­al com­mu­nist move­ment could polit­i­cal­ly ana­lyze how these phe­nom­e­na were artic­u­lat­ed with­in the broad­er inter­na­tion­al rela­tions of force. The dead-ends and con­tra­dic­to­ry ide­o­log­i­cal and polit­i­cal shifts that the LAI had to nav­i­gate also point to the insur­mount­able prob­lems of the anti-impe­ri­al­ist prac­tice of Com­intern-linked orga­ni­za­tions.

Hour of the Furnaces: Imperial Finance and the Colonization of Daily Life

Hour of the Furnaces: Imperial Finance and the Colonization of Daily Life

The state of bank­rupt­cy under impe­r­i­al rule inter­ro­gat­ed by Hora de los hornos allows us to con­sid­er what Randy Mar­tin diag­nosed as the “finan­cial­iza­tion of dai­ly life” togeth­er with what the Sit­u­a­tion­ists called the “col­o­niza­tion of every­day life” with­in cap­i­tal­ism, while sur­pass­ing each of these the­ses by insist­ing that quo­tid­i­an vio­lence is insep­a­ra­ble from impe­ri­al­ism as a his­tor­i­cal and cul­tur­al process.

“Negro Workers, Defend the Soviet Union and the Chinese Revolution!” – The International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers and the Political Rhetoric of The Negro Worker

“Negro Workers, Defend the Soviet Union and the Chinese Revolution!” – The International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers and the Political Rhetoric of The Negro Worker

The Negro Work­er sur­veyed the geo­gra­phies of colo­nial­ism and impe­ri­al­ism through the labor regimes which marked the uneven devel­op­ment of glob­al cap­i­tal­ism, and in doing so also plot­ted the dif­fer­ent tra­jec­to­ries and strate­gies of anti-colo­nial strug­gles.